for the SANDRINE

Is Facebook missing a target?

Have you ever experienced being treated like you do not exist? It hurts! And irritating sometimes. I experienced this in one restaurant.

Anyway, I will not talk about organizations’ poor training of their employees here. I would be talking about Facebook again. Hehe. I saw this report about the social networking site not seeing that a growing number of population in Facebook is the seniors (65 year old and above). You can read the whole report here http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/204380/facebook_marketing_misses_the_mark.html.

So what’s up with this? The report says that the advertising feature of Facebook only targets 64-year olds and below.

But as I have said earlier the number of seniors in Facebook is growing according to Pew Internet and American Life Project survey. It means from number 45, it became the number 3 most visited site by seniors. Moreover, they are using Facebook and Twitter more frequently, from a rate of 9% log in on a normal day in 2009 to 13% this year. That is already a significant increase.

So they are like missing the opportunity of advertising to a large number of possible targets. Considering the facts that these elders have more money to waste and more patience looking at advertisements, they really should extend the age bracket right?

But looking at the advertisements in Facebook, you could see that most of them are “trash.” The numbers of ads these kinds overshadow the “decent” and more reputable products. It seems that it’s useless for already known companies to use Facebook as a media tool. Maybe that’s the reason why Facebook maintained the settings that way. Since seniors prefer the trusted brands and well-established companies, there’s really no need for these companies to show themselves, more so through Facebook.

What do you think? Should Facebook even have to give a sh*t about this or could they just let it be?

Advertisements

4 responses

  1. haha. older people have more money to waste. I agree, especially that they are going to die soon so they should spend more and enjoy the rest of their remaining years.

    BAD ME.

    If facebook ads aren’t helpful in promoting products, then it’s not the facebook’s problem. soon, companies should realize that they’re just wasting their money over facebook ads.

    September 29, 2010 at 1:12 pm

  2. The point is… It wouldn’t hurt them to add people above 65 in their target demographics list. Nor would it stir an issue regarding facebook.

    What I see is inability to maximize the potential that facebook can give to marketing and advertisement. Placing rules and restrictions that are “just there” may not be detrimental but they can hamper possible potentials and opportunities.

    October 1, 2010 at 4:08 pm

  3. Perhaps yes, perhaps no. I’m a little in the middle because if we think about it. In the US, a person would’ve been put into a home for the aged by age 65 or lower. These older people have no income, just their pension. If they ever have extra money to spend, they wouldn’t be in the shape to be buying things recklessly. I think that perhaps the reason why FB is such a hit among them is that they are lonely old people thrown into a home for old people by the very children they raised and invested on. They’re in for the interactions and conversations.

    P.S. Ads in FB are affected by what you put in your profile information. That and some ads of companies who can afford to pay extra.

    October 2, 2010 at 1:27 pm

  4. It is a lesson for any organization out there. They have to constantly keep track of their stakeholders and the changes that are happening therein. The public has become less predictable and overgeneralization becomes a fatal error.

    The case of Facebook reflected change in terms of sizable demographics. With the report you cited, a relevant modification of Facebook’s promotions is yet expected.

    We’ll be eyeing on that. 🙂

    October 2, 2010 at 2:18 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s